Category Archives for "inspiration for jobs"

Live a life of gratitude

First of all, Happy New Year to everyone! I am a Christian. Not a right winged, over the edge, will-never-win-anyone-to-Jesus-because-I’m-in-your-face kind of Christian, but simply a serious follower of Jesus. In my opinion, regardless of one’s religious beliefs, it’s imperative to live a life of gratitude, because without gratitude there’s all too much in the world to be crabby about, and I choose not to go through life being crabby. Life’s too short for that.

I have been writing in a personal/private blog for about 5 years and have published nearly 1800 posts, and I started this volunteering and employment blog about half a year ago as well. I love having the archives of my thoughts because I can go back and reflect on my life as it was back then. It is one of the great benefits of blogging (much like journaling, which I did (paper and pen!) for many, many years).

Sometimes, it’s funny, sometimes it’s uncanny, and other times, It might be a little out of the ordinary. While I was reading through some of the older posts from a few years back before we had our second child (who happens to be a girl), I ran across a post entitled What Would Make Life Closer to Perfect. It was so interesting to read that 3 years later.

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It’s all there on bulletin boards

From the mundane to the mind-bending, it’s all there on bulletin boards.

Somewhere amid the chaos, perhaps, there is clarity. The answer to your problems. The deal of deals. A clue to what you need to know to be happier, smarter. Or, a plea for help. A call to action. An invitation. There are services rendered, services sought.

The bulletin board — the old-fashioned, off-line kind — plays social jazz, riffing on the erratic rhythm of our lives. Fliers offering pet-walking overlap notices selling self-improvement, which partly obscure the trash haulers, who distract from someone’s last-ditch effort to find her favorite sweater.

It doesn’t take anything more than a stapler to get a voice. You just need the right passerby to wade through the noisy collage and find you.

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How To Increase Your Confidence

You are the only person on Earth that can use your ability – Zig Ziglar

New managers go through it. Old managers go through it, but probably won’t admit it. It may not happen often, but it does happen.
What am I referring to? Your confidence as a professional.

Starting out, most would-be professional have that passion and drive to write an expert blog post every day.  Then it goes to every other day.  Then, a couple times a week.  Now, you’re looking at the site once a month.  Next thing you know, you forget about the expertise blog altogether.

This happened all because you lost your confidence in your own expertise. I noticed that being part of the GED class helped me to get back on track. Even though I joined online classes, the boost that I get is great.

You will start to think that “Yeah.  I can do this.”  If nothing else, seeing your blog with a reader with other blogs is an ego boost.  And who the hell doesn’t need an ego boost?  Hell, we’re writers.  Some of us are geeky, tech writers.  We were the ones in school who didn’t fit in with the rest of the cool kids, but we studied hard.

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First goal of every company should be organized abandonment

Similarly, in the business world, there’s nothing that so focuses a manager’s mind as knowing that a product or service they’ve spent ages building and fine-tuning will be abandoned in a year or six months. Otherwise, he won’t innovate. He’ll delay. Wait and see. Because abandonment is not what we’re trained to do in the office.

We’re a nation of problem-solvers, fixing what doesn’t work instead of building something new. The reason is simple: Innovation is very hard work. You put in years before you see any quantifiable result. Meanwhile, you’re being compensated for this quarter’s performance. So you put more money and more effort into squeaking a little more juice out of the old product.

Peter Drucker, the management sage observed that the first goal of every company should be “organized abandonment.” Simply put, every two or three years, each company needs to look at every product, service, and policy and see if it still makes sense. Ask yourself: “If we didn’t do this already, would we launch this again? Would we go into it?” If the answer is no, it’s time to start cutting.

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What I’m Thankful For

Ever since 9-11, every Thanksgiving seems to be more significant than many ones past. Before the Twin Towers attacks, many of us sat at our bountiful feasts and gave heartfelt though half-thought out thankfulness of what we had. No real deep thought into what or why we felt that we were thankful for something. Always our loved ones, but mostly because we love them. But no, so many years later, it still is different. Still, take a look at this nice video of the 2016 Thanksgiving Parade in Detroit:

After the 9-11 attacks, much of that changed, though sometimes it feels like each year has probably had a lesser degree of thoughtfulness, meaning…back to the hum-drum of what we’re actually thankful for. Unless we had family members fighting in the war, sick in a hospital, fighting a terminal disease, or some other recent significant event, we seemed to give it less and less thought.

But is that so? Here we are again. We just recovered from a fierce depression, the worst actually to hit the country since The Great Depression. So, do these events change what we’re truly are thankful for in our lives?

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Product Designers Of The Future

Three designers who are breaking away from the “normal” approach to design are Tom Gyr, Lil Yates, and Philip John Luscombe. Not content with following the crowd and just creating nice pieces, these three are proving that you can be crazier than Beyonce and Britney Spears with hair clippers and still create beautiful and intriguing products with a story behind them.

Product Designer Lil Yates looked towards OCD suffers when designing her latest collection made up of Checking Dice, Checking Stamp, and Symmetry Card. I’m not entirely sure her Checking Dice, designed to aid and reduce any stress suffered by OCD patients, met the needs of her brief.

Inspired by the cult-book The Dice Man, Lil’s dice have been created to show tasks the OCD sufferer must perform, such as check the oven, while the second and third dice determine how many times the task must be completed. Does this help or hinder an OCD sufferer though? Does it add yet more things to be performed every day or control what has to be done?

If the dice do fail the brief and in fact don’t help reduce stress, then they are, in effect, about as useful as an inflatable dartboard. I actually love these products as nice things, however, and believe that they show Lil has earned her.

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Free sampling As A Business Model – Money For Nothing

While the something-for-nothing business model has gone the way of Dionysian launch parties, two Web-based free sampling companies are trying to evolve into full-scale market research firms.

Both FreeSamples.com and StartSampling started their businesses by offering free product samples from their respective websites. But now, both realize that the real value of these offers is the information collected from the people who respond.

In fact, San Francisco-based FreeSamples.com admits it will likely change its name later this year to reflect the work it’s doing in partnership with United Business Media, a media research conglomerate. “The free sampling offer has become an actual hook to incentivize consumers to provide valuable insight,” says former FreeSamples CEO Jeff Malkin, who claims that two surveys sent to more than 200,000 of its sampling customers generated a 40 percent response rate.

That kind of customer data allows FreeSamples to target special offers to very specific consumers. “We’re using the offer to influence the behavior of consumers and result in increased sales,” Malkin says.

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Death Of Car Salesmen?

When automakers created the franchise dealer network in the 1910s, they believed they had invented a means of passing off enormous inventory costs to an army of salesmen. But as dealers became the sole point of contact with the auto-buying public, Detroit has often regretted the decision.

Today, simply getting a car to the customer adds more than a third to the sticker price. If manufacturers could just cut the dealers out of the picture, they could increase their margins significantly.

When auto shoppers started flocking to the Web to kick virtual tires years ago-8 out of every 10 car shoppers now browse online before making a purchase-carmakers believed they finally found a cost-effective way to make an end-run around the dealers. Nice try.

They ran head-first into a wall of state laws and other regulations that prohibit manufacturers from selling their vehicles directly to consumers-rules set in motion by Detroit itself decades ago.

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Why some startups fail

A couple of years ago. high-profile disaster Boo.com exemplifies everything that went dead wrong for dot-coms and the showy London-based urban sportswear site had to fire its employees and liquidate its assets. In a year and a half, Boo’s two Swedish founders had blown through roughly $250 million in venture capital. The spending spree resulted in lots of high technology but no sales.

Boo spent more than $25 million on a pre-launch advertising campaign, then hit the Web six months late. It set up distribution centers in the States and Germany, sprinkled offices around the globe, launched the Website in seven languages, and prayed that its pan-linguistic brand would catch on. It didn’t.

By the summer that followed, New York-based fashion portal fashionmall.com and British technology company Bright Station ultimately came to the rescue. Boo.com never lived again.

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